Snoop Dogg – Doggystyle Review

Before he was Uncle Snoop, Snoop Lion, and one of the most active and hysterical rappers on social media, Snoop (Doggy) Dogg was a 22 year old rapper under Dr. Dre’s wing. He went on to release his first album in 1993, ‘Doggystyle’. It is one of the most colourful, exciting, fun and best Hip-Hop album to be released. In ode of 4/20, it’s time to rewind, sit back, roll one up and review Snoop’s first album.

Beginning with the oddly comedic and cinematic intro “Bathtub” that opens the album with Snoop being interrupted by some of the homies and living “The American Dream”. Then “G-Funk” follows. Lady of Rage, Dre and Snoop trade bars of their unknown influence that would inspire years of rappers over thumping synths and crisp hi-hats. Snoop’s voice hasn’t changed at all since this album; he still has that high-pitched rugged sound that he uses on his more ‘gangster-esque’ tracks.

DRSNOOP

Following is the undeniable tune that anytime of day is good to have a joint too or some “Gin and Juice”. Dre supplies glossy synths, summer-vibe hi-hats and Snoop goes in with a slow flow filled with house-party vibe lyrics.

A timeless album like Snoop’s debut is just pure fire beginning to end. While I believe the majority of the tracks on this album are all of 110% quality, there are obviously my own favourites and tracks that stand out more than others. “Murder Was The Case” is in all of Snoop’s discography, one of his darker and more cinematic tracks. Over horror-themed synths, slow and melancholy drums and a creepy vocal sample, Snoop provides a dark and maleficent side of living in gang-ran communities and how in America, there isn’t a lot of help for those more vulnerable. Another track that stands out is the uplifting and funky piano-driven “Who Am I (What’s My Name)?”. As well as this, other classic smoke-too tracks on here are “Ain’t No Fun” containing some of the smoothest Nate Dogg vocals ever and “Gz and Hustlas”.

In all, Snoop’s debut album is progressive and alike to his predecessors, NWA, Ice Cube, Big Daddy Kane as well as more modern acts such as Jay Rock, Kendrick Lamar and J.I.D, he challanges the stigmatisation of African-American’s, poverty in the Black community and how gang lifestyle is prevalent throughout less-focused and supported areas.

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